Holiday Safety for pets

  This is such a fun and exciting time of year with lots of family & friends! Here are a few quick tips for keeping your pets safe and content during all of the holiday hub-bub:    Keep a close eye on pets around decorations.  Glass or metal ornaments, tinsel, and artificial snow are dangerous if ingested.  We recommend skipping tinsel if you have cats in the house.  It's pretty irresistible to them and can cause serious problems if eaten. Christmas tree water can also be toxic if ingested due to pesticides and fire retardants from the tree.    It's tempting to want to include our fuzzy kids in the holiday feast, but it's best to avoid "people foods".  Some foods, such as chocolate and artificial sweeteners, are very dangerous to pets. Other foods can be too rich and cause upset tummies or even pancreatitis. Bones are always a "no-no".    Be cautious with candles and floral decorations. Candles can be knocked over, or tails can swish into the flames. Holly, Mistletoe, Poinsettia and Lilies are all toxic if eaten.    Before placing that gift under the tree, be sure that it's not edible. You don't want to put a box of chocolates in reach of your curious pets!    Be sure that alcoholic beverages are closely monitored. If ingested your pet could become weak, ill, or in extreme cases, go into respiratory failure.    Keep a lid on all the trash cans! This one is pretty self-explanatory!    Holiday crackers, noise makers, and horns are great fun for us, but your pet's ears are very sensitive. If your party will include this type of hilarity, be sure that your pet is in a quiet spot well away from the noise. Confetti and tinsel can cause serious problems if ingested, sometimes resulting in surgery to remove.      Pay attention to your pet's needs during all the hustle and bustle.  Does she need a quiet place away from all the hub-bub?  Will he get so excited that he'll forget to eat and drink, and run himself ragged?  Will she enjoy playing with the small children that are visiting? Will he need a new puzzle toy, such as a Kong, to keep him occupied, or a good long run before the guests arrive? Make a plan!

This is such a fun and exciting time of year with lots of family & friends! Here are a few quick tips for keeping your pets safe and content during all of the holiday hub-bub:

Keep a close eye on pets around decorations.  Glass or metal ornaments, tinsel, and artificial snow are dangerous if ingested.  We recommend skipping tinsel if you have cats in the house.  It's pretty irresistible to them and can cause serious problems if eaten. Christmas tree water can also be toxic if ingested due to pesticides and fire retardants from the tree.

It's tempting to want to include our fuzzy kids in the holiday feast, but it's best to avoid "people foods".  Some foods, such as chocolate and artificial sweeteners, are very dangerous to pets. Other foods can be too rich and cause upset tummies or even pancreatitis. Bones are always a "no-no".

Be cautious with candles and floral decorations. Candles can be knocked over, or tails can swish into the flames. Holly, Mistletoe, Poinsettia and Lilies are all toxic if eaten.

Before placing that gift under the tree, be sure that it's not edible. You don't want to put a box of chocolates in reach of your curious pets!

Be sure that alcoholic beverages are closely monitored. If ingested your pet could become weak, ill, or in extreme cases, go into respiratory failure.

Keep a lid on all the trash cans! This one is pretty self-explanatory!

Holiday crackers, noise makers, and horns are great fun for us, but your pet's ears are very sensitive. If your party will include this type of hilarity, be sure that your pet is in a quiet spot well away from the noise. Confetti and tinsel can cause serious problems if ingested, sometimes resulting in surgery to remove.  

Pay attention to your pet's needs during all the hustle and bustle.  Does she need a quiet place away from all the hub-bub?  Will he get so excited that he'll forget to eat and drink, and run himself ragged?  Will she enjoy playing with the small children that are visiting? Will he need a new puzzle toy, such as a Kong, to keep him occupied, or a good long run before the guests arrive? Make a plan!